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called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i think this is the number one sold on amazon.com and it is riveting to show how does organization has managed to infiltrate into various capitals throughout the western world and it has managed to come under the obama administration, metastasize and so without any further ado i would like to introduce you to a wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank you for hosting this event. i look at sera as a modern-day esther or deborah. such a time as this. thank you for having me here. if you write a book, you spend a year with that and say this book can put me through pack. but i think that people are reading it. it gets into detail about the main player in the arab spring, which i refers to as the islamist winter in the butt. the muslim brotherhood is done, out of power in egypt, we don't have to worry about them. this is the postmortem of history. it has been has the muslim brotherhood, the leaders were killed and imprisoned in the group was banned for decades. the headquarters was burned to the ground. c
to african countries that trade with the u.s. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: senator mark pryor's joining us on "the communicators" this week. he's chair of the commerce subcommittee on communications technology and the internet. senator pryor, your full committee recently approved tom wheeler to be fcc nominee. senator cruz, your colleague, has talked about putting a hold on that nomination. is there any word on that right now? >> guest: well, we're working on that. let me first say thank you for having me on, it's great to be on the show, and also let me say thank you to c-span for all the public interest broadcasting they do. it's great. i know you don't belief this, people in arkansas say, hey, i saw you on c-span, so i want to thank c-span for what they did k. let me get back to the tom wheeler nomination. basically, there's a sentiment within the senate that we ought to pair this with a republican nominee. i think everybody's comfortable with tom wheeler as far as i know, but the r
and i think they writely believed that america's apparent america'sability to flinfluencee evenltsdz would be limited and it's costly to try. >> almost a year anniversary of the benghazitac. it was airstrikes on libya. that was what many are proposing now for syria, and now, it seems like the situation in libya is much worse than it was under gaddafi in certain ways. >> i think any time you get involved in a war, you cannot entirely predict the outcome. so i think there is certainly a war weariness in the u.s. but a war wariness as well. people really are worried about these sorts of things. but i do believe that the use of chemical weapons, the use of these banned weapons by this regime is something that the obama administration absolutely must react to. again, i don't think the obama administration is interested in leading the american people into a long-term war, nor does anyone in the obama administration really believe that airstrikes will somehow embolden or sustain the opposition, the rebel sources such that they could somehow march on damascus and throw assad out. so i think
is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. >>> then a big question that affects us all, for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skyscrapers and congestion? more detroit? we'll look at the upsides and the down sides of an ever more urban world. we've got a terrific battle that has some surprising ideas. >>> also, "les miserables." it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in a world of young democracies, from egypt to turkey to brazil. protest marches and one coup. as we watched the turbulence around the world, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is, but rather, how undemocratic it is. hear me out -- we have three co-equal branches of government. and the one with the final say on man
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
the latest news online any time of day at www.aljazeera.com. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. >> we spent time with the gangster disciples. >> escape from the unexpected. >> i am a cancer survivor, not mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. inside of it. >> as the cries in syria plays out, rogue hackers have been busy with cyber attacks on the u.s. if you tried to go to "the new york times" website tuesday to get the latest on syria, you would have been directed to the syrian electric army instead manufacture it has been restored, but twitter accounts and even president obama's social media has been sit since the war in syria began. while it has been a nuisance, the threat o
? >> and now, "bbc world news america." president obama cancels a moscow summit with president putin. this after russia grantor -- granted edwards snowden asylum, sending at chill through relations. throughoutg flights the region. it cost billions and has the backing of key countries. inside a project which could power the future. pairs of atoms and infusing them together. this will release more energy. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. today relations between the u.s. and russia and another snack when president obama canceled a planned meeting with president putin in russia next month. this comes just days after russia decided to grant asylum to the former intelligence analyst, edwards noted. -- edward snowden. two towering figures on the world stage. relations between russia and washington have never been more, has hadpresident obama a major diplomatic snub aimed at president putin. edward snowden is at the center of the latest round. the former contractor fled america after leaking government secrets. the u.s. is unhappy after russia g
america." president obama announced his government surveillance program and assesses this deteriorating relationship with russia. >> we're doing things that are good for the united states and hopefully good for russia as well. but recognizing there are going to be some differences. we will not be able to completely disguise them. >> hiding in plain sight. this sicilian mafia boss was living in italy for decades. italy wants him back to serve his time. it is summer. it must be time for that vacation souvenir. we will trace how the trinkets have become big business. onwelcome to our viewers public television in america and around the globe. today president obama held a wide ranging press conference at the white house on the eve of leaving for his summer vacation. on the agenda was announcing new oversight and transparency in the surveillance programs that have come under fire. relations with russia were also front and center. presidenturged clinton to think forward instead of backward. tourged president putin think forward instead of backwards. u.s. foreign and defense
to the middle east that's different from america. he takes pride in that and on the basis of that he's made allies. to give snowden, a highly symbolic figure given the surveillance issue would have collided with what putin's done in international affairs. but at home he has a political elite. forget society. the political elite didn't want him to make this concession to the united states. >> rose: we conclude with julian guthrie, a journalist who has written a book about larry ellison called "the billionaire and the mechanic." it details the story of his quest for the america's cup. >> and it was expected that larry would partner with a better-known yacht club on san francisco's waterfront, the st. francis yacht club. and there's a fun story in the book about what happened or what didn't happen between the st. francis and larry ellison. but it's a story that doesn't come along very often and i became became very enamored with the drama of the two men before i became interested in the america's cup. >> rose: egypt, russia and the america's cup when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose c
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry work in, and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions and a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." president obama cancels a moscow summit with president putin. this after russia grantor -- granted edwards snowden asylum, sending at chill through relations. throughoutg flights the region. it cost billions and has the backing of key countries. inside a project which could power the future. pairs of atoms and infusing them together. this will release more energy. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. today relations between the u.s. and russia and another snack when presiden
the nation. >> what was at stake that day? >> the future of america. >> was dr. king's dream fulfilled? the powerhouse roundtable weighs in on that and all the week's politics. it's all right here this sunday morning. >> from abc news, a special edition of "this week" with martha raddatz in cairo. and jonathan karl in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwill
was its impact on the real washington-- that is, the washington that governs the united states of america? in the lead, martin luther king, the man hailed today above all the others. >> i still have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream. i have a dream. >> schieffer: today, we'll talk about king's dream and the state of race relations with some prominent american american leaders, including former secretary of state colin powell, and legendary civil rights leader, georgia congressman, john lewis, who was with king that day. plus we'll hear general powell's advice to the president on the crisis in the middle east. >> in both egypt and syria, america has to take a much more-- much more clever role. >> schieffer: we'll also talk about the situation in syria with jack reed and michael mccaul. it's all ahead on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning, again. tens of thousands turned out in washington yesterday to mark the 50th anniversary of the march. we'll begin today wit
the way he saw america's potential relationship with all these middle east countries the word is reciprocity. he believed these countries should receive something in return. it wasn't good enough for the united states to function like a european colonial power and extract the resources of these countries and those countries receive nothing in return. this was alarming and disturbing to winston churchill and the british because the british had behaved in the middle east in a way that was exclusively extracted without those countries receiving much. occasionally a small number of countries receive something in return but president roosevelt had a more universal idea of reciprocity. look at saudi arabia. in saudi arabia the american oil companies were at that time by and large dividing the proceeds of the oil extraction 50/50. this was not occurring with the oil company in iran or the iraqi petroleum company which was largely dominated by the british in iraq so the british fought the american involvement in the middle east if the americans were going to use saudi arabia as a mode
brotherhood. it's called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i am a slow reader, but i went through read in one afternoon because i could not put it down. it is such a page turner. i think number one on amazon in terms of books about the middle east. it is reading to show how this organization that was established in 1929 has managed to infiltrate into various capital throughout the restaurant -- the western world and unfortunately into our very own. it has managed to, under the obama administration, metastasize and has been influencing power. without any further ado are like to introduce you to have wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank sarah for a first of all hosting this event and the endowment for middle east troops has such phenomenal work. i looked at sarah as a modern-day esther, deborah. i really do. such a time as this to thank god for the organization and when you're doing and think of revving a year. you don't want to look at it. i know people are reading it. this is really the first book since the so-called arab spring broke out that get
, but also america's core self interests. >> the army major convicted of killing 13 people at fort hood in texas has been sentenced to die. nadal hassan was sentenced earlier today. that sentence will be automatically appealed. >> on the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech, thousands gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement
commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&t mobile share for business. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s.
american game. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> i have a dream. my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. [applause] >> his words forever penned in american history. it has been 5 50 years since dr. mayor tin luther king, junior delivered his iconic i have a dream speech. this weekend tens of thousandsdiothousandsdescended o continue his vision and many warn that the advances are now in danger of being rolled back. [applause] >> the crowds in front of the lynne kl memorial did not match the 200,000 or more that watched martin luther king at the same spot a half century ago but the determination to see america redeem his vision was strong as children veronica and benisha were at the 25th anniversa
jazeera america launched a new and needed voice in journalism. the new york times calls it "serious, straight-forward news". "accurate, responsible" says the washington post. and the baltimore sun says, "instantly engaging and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. make sure that stories don't escape them. >> every day a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you heard angles you hadn't considered. consider this, antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo. stories that matter to you. saudi arabia for that. ♪ test test .. . .. . but should you be made aware if you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." welcome back to al jazeera. members of congress are being briefed right now about syria. >> possibly to start the end of this week, about now. now things look so very different. the loyal britt whose have stood by the americans in iraq, and afghanistan will not be onboard, this time. so obama has to decide, i think, whether to go it alone with perhaps the support of the french. and it looks like there
coverage of what is happening in the world as well as what is happening in america. from here is a call next alabama. welcome. walter, are you there? you're on the air. i had a brother served in vietnam. realize like going into a rack them of the women, and putting our boys over there and women and the people here were calling in criticizing. if they would take a gun and do something like that, it is different. if it were not for our armed forces, we would be controlled by other countries. just like in the united states, these folk who rob banks or stuff and this that going on all the time. ain't none of us perfect, but i think our soldiers are doing a good job. media,o you think the the usb then, does a good job of covering our efforts in afghanistan and before that to my iraq? host: i sure do. i sure do.ler: host: go ahead. i am a former korean, vietnam veteran, and to make -- to me, the meeting is you have two efferent sides of the story from different angles. i tend to go to the foreign media to see what they think of us. at the same time, i think the lady talked about looking at wh
at where america lost its way could use this town as a primary source. go to cnn.com/fareed for a link to my "washington post" column this week, and let's get started. >>> when the rungs on the ladder of opportunity grow farther and farther apart, it undermines the very essence of america. that idea that if you work hard, you can make it here. >> that was president obama last week. in fact one thing that both right and left agree on is that social and economic mobility, bowing able to make it no matter where you start from, is at the heart of the american dream. in recent years the most depressing statistics about this country have been that that mobility has declined, particularly compared with other countries, despite the anecdotes and celebrated examples, most americans appear to be stuck in the economic strata into which they were born. last week the most detailed study on this topic was released. it provides lots of fascinating clo clues about the causes of our problem, breaking american mobility down by geography. for example, if you were born in a detroit family in the bottom fi
far. >>> those are the headlines at that hour. "america tonight" is next on al jazeera. i'll see you back here at 11:00 eastern time, 8 pacific. ♪ >>> on "america tonight," building the case for action against syria, u.s. forces stand ready to go now what is next? >>> a spike in temperatures forces a time-out. the hid endangers for young athletes, and what can save them. >> we helped him up and started walking back to school, and the fell once again. >>> and timeless words scrawled on scraps, how the letter from birmingham jail lead to a revolutionary moment in american history. >> the letter was a call to the national conscious of america. ♪ >>> and good evening. thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. a showdown looms with washington tonight that western powers are gearing up for some kind of military strike against the government of bashar al-assad. tell us what all of this means. and what is going to happen next? >> the white house insists that the president has not yet made a decision to go ahead with military strikes. you would not know that from the rhetoric with -- from
, this point in time for america to start to lead -- this president to lead. to come before congress and get the approval of congress to do this, he should be able to make this case, i think if he tries to make it, he'll get the boot from congress. >> thank you for being with us. appreciate it, joining me with reaction to this developing story. ann coulter is with us. two big questions i have here. if they're not going for regime change, we have two big questions before us, number one, we have the israelis. now, if iran and syria are saying if they get a cruise missile attack, they're going to attack israel. is the president prepared to defend them? >> no. >> and number two. >> let's start with that one. >> wait a minute. we have to consider that. and what's the point then of lobbying missiles -- >> it's very depressing talking about foreign policy, whenever a democrat is president, because they don't care about america's national intraspective. that should be the only concern the man makes -- by the way, i don't think the president does have to go to congress to bomb someone. he's the comma
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promised to resolve the crisis, and centered this clip from america's got talent, while she shopped online for pricey jewelry and furniture. the president has assisted he has had popular support. he says he is trying to protect his country and his people. but critics say he only wants to protect his own power. >> so how did he go from a westernized eye doctor to becoming the president of syria using chemical weapons to massacre his own people. i appreciate you both being here. you interbothed bashar and his father -- >> yes, i did. >> what is your impression of this man? >> i interviewed him very early in his term as president. and he was an unknown. whereas his father had been really ruthless, but he was tough, ruthless, clever, and the son was an unknown quantity. >> despite his western leanings because he had been in london for so long -- >> yes, and i think there were some hopes that syria could be broken off from iran at that point, strategically. >> and ed this is not a guy who resembled your saddam hussein and gadhafis. how he has turned out to be very similar to those guys. >> he i
. >> but experts say it is a stretch for the president to say attacking syria is somehow about keeping america safe. >> the only way that the president can legally strike syria is somehow related it to america's defense. quite frankly, i think he is making a pretty tenuous case. >> the other big question concerns precedent. never before have they attacked another country. when sue dam hussein gassed thousands of turks the world took little action. even the state department admits there is no movement. >> is there aware precedent for an u.s. administration to use the use of chemical weapons as a justification to take some kind of retaliatory action. >> no. not to that specific question. >> so there is no precedent? >> not that i'm aware of, no. >> the closest comparison may be operation dessert fox. in 1998, that's when the u.s. led a four day bombing campaign. in april 1993, when they launched tom hawks into in an attempt to assassinate george hw bush. in an interview with the washington post aspen said. request experts say this isn't about sending a message to syria at all. but to another american
solutions in a wide range of industries. >> andan we do for you? now, "bbc world news america." london, i'm from kathy k. the u.s. issues a global travel same al qaedathe threats that will close many american embassies on sunday. iran gets ready for an rouhani.tion of a son -- afghanistan's most first -- first female airplane pilot. >> welcome to our viewers. today the united states issued a global travel alert, citing an al qaeda threat. promptingsame thread the state department to close 21 of its embassies and consulates this sunday, mainly in the muslim world. according to officials, the challenge a potential terrorism is greatest in the middle east and north africa. unrest continues to rattle that region. i spoke with michael singer, a former director of middle east affairs at the white house national security council. you have been in the room when these decisions are made. what is it, the alert of this nature? >> as a government you have information that comes across the radar, which is serious and credible. you are under an obligation to share it publicly. it seems like
bbc world news america. fax britain will wait for you in un inspectors -- acting oning syria. they have sentenced the army psychologist to death for killing 13 people during a rampage in texas. 50 years after martin luther historicvered his speech, president obama stands on the same spot for the commemoration. >> no one can match his brilliance, but we are willing to take our first step for justice. i know that flame remains. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there appears to be a split over when and how to act against syria. the british government says it will wait for a report from inspectors, but the u.s. says action cannot be held up by intransigence. as the world waits to see what the u.s. and its allies will do, syrian neighbors are preparing for repercussions. >> in syria it self the u.n. weapons inspectors have been taking their first look at one of the areas where chemical weapons were supposedly used. senior british officials are .ure americans it is hard to think britain will not be involved, but the british government
made the announcement we have to act. before kerry said in front of the world the word of america is at stake. before the entire administration leaked the plan to explain exactly were it had to act. right now we are way beyond the other arguments, we are way beyond the polls. way beyond the issues, is this the best way to attack. i this it is not. the only -- >> it doesn't matter -- >> cannot be -- >> you have to listen for a second to martin dempsey if the chairman of joint chiefs of staff says to you, it doesn't matter if we go tomorrow, it doesn't matter if we go next week, we will still have an effective military strike against assad. we will hurt assad. then that open it is window to this that so many americans want to take place. >> why? there is no gap that we can hurt assad. and i don't think that the chairman of the joint chiefs is the one who decides how america should act as a way to uphold its word and strength in the region. he tells the president what to work -- what works and what doesn't. we agree it could work, depending how you design it. the question is once you
america involved in a costly new war in syria. the president is not telegraphing, what, if anything, he intends to do about this week's alleged chemical weapons massacre. ed henry is traveling with the president and reports from scranton, pennsylvania. >> reporter: while both he and joe biden focused on domestic issues, on the international stage president obama found his credibility on the line as he used a cnn interview to comment about the alleged chemical weapons attack in syria that may have killed up to 1,800 people. >> when you start seeing chemical weapons used on a large scale and again we're still gathering information about this particular event, it is very troublesome. that starts getting to some core national interests that the united states has. both in terms of us making sure that weapons of mass destruction are not proliferating and needing to protect our allies. >> reporter: that was a nod to deliberation sources say are happening inside the administration over whether the u.s. military will use cruise missiles to punish syrian president bashar al assad yet the presiden
the one, fighting to be a part of america, and you see fearlessness in almost every state if you look. >> you were inspired because of what happened with trayvon martin? is that one of the reasons that somebody from their generation has become -- he was mentioned three our fortimes in different speeches, excluding by dr. king's sister. >> it was an alarm cloic for a lot of young people. then for the verdict to not go the way we had expected or plan i think set off a lot of young even. all i have to do is look around, but i do think that having someone that was our generation that looked just like us taken out of, you have the case of israel hernandez in miami, an artist just graffiti'ing an abandoned mcdonald's taken out. young people are starting to observe that hey, possibly the america we have today isn't the one we want tomorrow. >> interesting in 1963, obviously it was a lot of young people that came out that was the 8th anniversary of emmett till's slaying, but i have to play you this. at the end of the '63 march, they listed ten demands of things that they thought were importan
almost quite obviously referred to in that interview, if america's core national interests are at stake? >> let me go to paul, who is in capitol hill, and paul, of course, many members of congress back home on recess that's why they have this conference call, have you heard anything tonight? >> well, that's right. there is mounting frustration what we are hearing. mounting bipartisan frustration, they are worried that any attack can draw the u.s. further into the syrian conflict. and they are also frustrated about the lack of an end game. about a clear policy for a way out. >> paul, do we know anything about the briefing at the white house that they had with congress? have you hear anything about that. >> they have heard there are problems with that video conference. a problem securing enough video conference lines so the conference had to be declassified on ur classified report. president obama said it wouldn't be regime change or even changes the civil war. they are trying to keep it out of the hands of terrorists. >> we know the ashad regime maintains stock piles. we have indicated o
bugging, the united nations? a new report says america's spy agency, the nsa, targeted u.n. headquarters. in minutes, what the latest allegations against the nsa could mean for washington and our allies. and when you run with the bulls, you want to dodge the horns. but there's another danger lurking in america's newest past time, the drones over the sand. no really, you have to watch out for those, too, apparently. i am harris faulkner. the pope, leader of one billion catholics around the world has spoken about syria. as you know, world governments, including our own, are pondering what to do about the civil war in syria creating millions of refugees, putting pressure on neighboring muslim countries and potentially punching holes in an already fragile imbalance there. it could be the opening for terrorists to capitalize on the chaos in syria. aside from the wrangling by the politicians and diplomats, today, pope francis called for action, urging the international community to step up efforts to help syria end the war. the pope addressed tens of thousands of worshippers in st. peter's squ
. >>> later, made in america, a label that's been disappearing lately, but a new movie is highlighting companies that are keeping jobs right here in the united states. i'll talk with the film's director. >>> about next i'm taking your questions on "ask ed live" my favorite segment coming up. i think farmers care more about the land than probably anyone else. we've had this farm for 30 years. we raise black and red angus cattle. we also produce natural gas. that's how we make our living and that's how we can pass the land and water back to future generations. people should make up their own mind what's best for them. all i can say is it has worked well for us. she loves a lot of it's what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditi
targets were in the arab world and in africa, there could also be attacks in europe or north america. now, if it is a global travel alert, then it isn't really a travel, but rather an existence alert. the public announcement had all the hallmarks of the old color-coded alerts of the bush era. threatening enough to make people anxious and vague enough to give them little to do about it. but what about al qaeda? well, al qaeda central, the organization centered in afghanistan and pakistan, is in fact battered and broke. but the idea of al qaeda remains vibrant in some other places. not, as it turns out, in the great hot beds of islamic radicalism such as saudi arabia, but rather in places where the government is so weak it simply cannot control its own territory. yemen, somalia, mali, northern nigeria. so what kind of strategy should the united states pursue against these very small groups in very weak states? there are three possible paths. the first would be a more full bore counterinsurgency strategy, the kind that general david petraeus executed in iraq and to a lesser degree in afghani
that america wants to be a partner in the egyptian people's pursuit of a better future, but our partnership must also advance the principles that we believe in. >> bob, that was president obama earlier today. you worked at the state department. dealt with a lot of different crises over your time there and have watched many. is the president just caught between a rock and a hard place here and did he put himself in this position? >> i don't think he put himself in a position. it is a rock and hard place. interesting thing he said there, we cannot continue as usual, which means the $1.8 billion that goes to the military, is what he's talking about. >> i don't know. >> well, don't know what? >> i think they're going to -- the white house, state department said they are going to review all of the aid that we give to egypt but, andrea, they did not say specifically they would be ending military aid, although that is on the table? >> they didn't. he also said that he doesn't take sides. president obama. and i do think he brought this upon himself because he does take sides. he took the wrong side
from america and its allies is on the cards. we just don't know when it might come. but as syria's ambassador to the u.n. said the country right now is in a state of war and preparing for the worse. >> that's john terrett reporting. bam as der. when you look at that bam and when you, might that be the reason why there has been hesitancy to get involved with syria. >> i don't think so at all. i think that if the united states wished to apply direct military force to take out the syrian air force, for example, it could do so. we face terrorist threats were hezbollah and iran already, and yes, it can get worse, but at the same time i think we're facing those things already. the issue for the. >> obama: administration ifor ff the conflict. >> can you talk about the question of why chemical weapons have become the red line? thousands of people were killed in syria by the government already, we didn't take action. >> right. >> suddenly because chemical weapons are used we're taking action. what sense does that make? >> yes, it's an interesting point of view. my point of view is really
>> this is bbc world news america. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu,newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. >> andan we do for you? now, "bbc world news america." london, i'm from kathy k. the u.s. issues a global travel same al qaedathe threats that will close many american embassies on sunday. iran gets ready for an rouhani.tion of a son -- afghanistan's most first -- first female airplane pilot. >> welcome to our viewers. today the united states issued a global travel alert, citing an al qaeda threat. promptingsame thread the state department to close 21 of its embassies and consulates this sunday, mainly in the muslim world. according to officials, the challenge a po
to one person. it belongs to the people of america and i think whoever lives in it should preserve its tradition and enhance it and leave something of themselves there. next on booktv author susan crawford talks about her book "captive audience" the telecom industry and monopoly power in the new gilded age. she argues that america's economic future could be threatened by other countries that have internet capabilities that are faster and cheaper. author andrew blum hosts this hour-long discussion. >> host: thank you for being here and thank you for doing this. >> guest: i've been looking forward to talking to you. >> host: what is the status of rock band in america today? >> guest: well we have a picture that is quite different than the other developed nations. we have got very high download speeds in america cable and local monopolies in each region of the country that dominate that market and sell for 85% of americans their only choice where they live is going to be their local cable monopoly. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in
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